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natural disaster and failed bury rock sees. >> the surprise to everybody including to us is that we could do it all pretty much without batting an eye lash. >> a prominent evangelical leader reflects on 25 years in the culture wars. plus, menorahs and lighting the hanukkah lamps. >> welcome. i'm bob aber nathy. it's good to have you with us. members of congress came together for the annual lighting of the capitol christmas tree, although they were deadlocked on matters. religious groups advocated for action on the fiscal cliff and other issues. a coalition of religious leaders, law enforcement and business people urged lawmakers to prioritize immigration reform. the group included both liberal and conservative clergy who called for legislation that respects the dignitiy of immigrants and creates a pathway to citizenship and secures the border. >> it's time to secure on you values, values that include, faith and hope and charity. >> jewish groups are divided over israel's plans to construct new settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem. the controversial announcement came a day after
on the phil buster, a tactic used to delay legislation but republicans say the tool is key to protecting their minority rights. >> warner: on the eve of world aids day, ray suarez updates the hopes and frustrations in the fight against the deadly disease. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> warner: and is the grand canyon 60 million years older than we've long thought? we ask science correspondent miles o'brien. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've b
with us. as congress and the president struggle to reach an agreement on taxes and federal spending, religious leaders gathered on capitol hill to once again urge lawmakers to protect antipoverty programs. the interfaith group called cuts to those programs immoral. >> we as religious call on our country's leaders to not push the country's most marginalized peoples off the fiscal cliff, >>> palestinians celebrated this week after the united nations general assembly voted overwhelmingly to recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state. many jewish groups denounced the u.n. action, saying it undermines future peace negotiations with israel. some u.s. christian and muslim leaders supported the move. the palestinians were not granted full u.n. membership, but their upgraded status could allow them access to other u.n. and international bodies, including the international criminal court where they could possibly bring charges against israel. the united states was one of nine nations that voted against the resolution. >>> in egypt, seven coptic christians and a controversial american p
for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: house republicans today offered their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance that is cessy withut raising rates on the top 2% wealthiest americans. the math simply does not add
about cutting that and that's a frightening thought. while some of us are eating at banquets while people are starving outside our door. that's not right. >> to pass a comprehensive tax reform that would get rid of most of the deductions. not charitable deductions however, charitable deductions are critical to civil society, but to eliminate a lot of loop holes and to bring about a bipartisan effort to get the government on a sound footing. >> the principal is you've got to protect poor and vulnerable people as you find a path to fiscal sustainability. both are moral issues. >> it's hard to overestimate the importance of getting healthcare to 40 or 50 million people who did not have access to it before. that's just huge and as the wealthiest nation in the world, not to ve healthcare foall was just a profound embarrassment. >> as bishops we've been working on healthcare reform for years. now there are issues about the healthcare reform that's been passed, the affordable healthcare act, that we have concerns about, one, some of the conscience issues. >> i hope he protects religious l
of the new film, this is 40. joining us paul rudd, leslie mann and judd apatow. >> i think it is a couple that my own onion is tt they love each other and they're deal well problems that a lot of marriages deal with. and maybe they're just handling it in the wrong way sometimes. and i think they're kind of succumbing to the pressures of all of it. >> like paul said we kind of share a brain and so we, you know, we have a shorthand with each other, with all of it. and we have i mean we're constantly having conversations about what we are-- about screens and these characters. >> it is person. we debate all the time how truthful it is, and how personal it is. and some days it is like this is really personal, this isn't like us at all. so we change our opinion moment to moment,. >> rose: al hunt, julianna goldman, george stevens, paul rud, leslie mann and paul apatow when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following kohl qol captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: we're in washington where fiscal
understands that we have a responsibility to use american power wisely, especially our military power. and he knows, from persol experience, that when we send our troops into harm's way, we must give them the sound strategy, a clear mission, and the resources that they need to get the job done. in an extraordinarily distinguished senate career and as chairman of the foreign relations committee, john has played a central role in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years. as we turn the page on a decade of war, he understands that we've got to harness all elements of american power and ensure that they're working together-- diplomatic and development, economic and political, military and intelligence-- as well as the power of our values which inspire so many people around the world. he is not going to need a lot of on-the-job training. he has earned the respect and trust of his senate colleagues, democrats and republicans. i think it's fair to say that few individuals know as many presidents and prime ministers, or grasp our foreign policies as firmly as john kerry. and this makes h
it possible that the elect one, the messiah, the righteous one, the holy one"-- any title they use of jesus-- "is it possible that such a one could be oppressed, persecuted, and executed?" they go into the hebrew scriptures, and, of course, what they find is that it's almost like a job description of being god's righteous one, to be persecuted and even executed. >> and the amazing thing is, they said, "hey, pilate's right. he was the king of the jews. and, moreover, god has vindicated this claim that he is the king of the jews by raising him from the dead." >> ( dramatized ): an angel of the lord, descending from heaven, came and rolled back the stone. he said to the women, "jesus who was crucified, he has been raised. come, see the place where he lay." >> the stories about the resurrection in the gospels make two very clear points: first of all, that jesus really, really was dead; and secondly, that his disciples really and with absolute conviction saw him again afterwards. the gospels are equally clear that it's not a ghost. i mean, even though the raised jesus walks through a shut door i
of scholars and historians, theologians and archaeologists, to return to that time and use our best efforts to understand that story... of a man born in obscurity in whose name a faith was made. >> narrator: we know so little about him-- that he was born more than 2,000 years ago, and that he lived in palestine. we know he was baptized and became a preacher. and we know that he was publicly executed. >> ( dramatized ): what manner of man is this that even the winds and the seas obey him? >> narrator: with so little evidence to go by, archaeologists must sift the clues, and scholars decode the stories told by the first followers of jesus. >> the problem for any historian in trying to reconstruct the life of jesus is simply that we don't have sources that come from the actual time of jesus himself. >> the historian's task in understanding jesus and the jesus movement and early christianity is a lot like the archaeologist's task in excavating a tell. you peel back layer after layer after layer of interpretation, and what you always find is a plurality of jesuses. >> history isn't made to recor
services used to function. so that's one of the other things. >> brown: you are thinking of that as an experiment but in the meantime you're pushing for the extension. i mean what should happen as of december 31st. >> as of december 31st we think the program should be reauthorized as it is today. the measures of long-term unemployment have not changed at all since congress reauthorized this program. so we want it to stay the same and make sure that family its have that income support so they can stay attached to the workforce, so they can stay out of poverty and hopefully get back into this system, back into working as quickly as possible. >> brown: i know you want to experiment but are you also for extending. >> you can't go back to 14 weeks. and 26 weeks is probably going to be insufficient. but let's keep in mind that we would extend for humanitarian purposes. the economic evidence is fairly clear that extensions well beyond that 26 weeks adds to the period of time that people are unemployed. there is about a 5% increase in that because the incentive isn't there to get
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)